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Prednisone Oral tablet

What is this medicine?

PREDNISONE (PRED ni sone) is a corticosteroid. It is commonly used to treat inflammation of the skin, joints, lungs, and other organs. Common conditions treated include asthma, allergies, and arthritis. It is also used for other conditions, such as blood disorders and diseases of the adrenal glands.

How should I use this medicine?

Take this medicine by mouth with a glass of water. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Take this medicine with food. If you are taking this medicine once a day, take it in the morning. Do not take more medicine than you are told to take. Do not suddenly stop taking your medicine because you may develop a severe reaction. Your doctor will tell you how much medicine to take. If your doctor wants you to stop the medicine, the dose may be slowly lowered over time to avoid any side effects.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • changes in emotions or moods

  • changes in vision

  • depressed mood

  • eye pain

  • fever or chills, cough, sore throat, pain or difficulty passing urine

  • increased thirst

  • swelling of ankles, feet

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • confusion, excitement, restlessness

  • headache

  • nausea, vomiting

  • skin problems, acne, thin and shiny skin

  • trouble sleeping

  • weight gain

What may interact with this medicine?

Do not take this medicine with any of the following medications:

  • metyrapone

  • mifepristone

This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

  • aminoglutethimide

  • amphotericin B

  • aspirin and aspirin-like medicines

  • barbiturates

  • certain medicines for diabetes, like glipizide or glyburide

  • cholestyramine

  • cholinesterase inhibitors

  • cyclosporine

  • digoxin

  • diuretics

  • ephedrine

  • female hormones, like estrogens and birth control pills

  • isoniazid

  • ketoconazole

  • NSAIDS, medicines for pain and inflammation, like ibuprofen or naproxen

  • phenytoin

  • rifampin

  • toxoids

  • vaccines

  • warfarin

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, talk to your doctor or health care professional. You may need to miss a dose or take an extra dose. Do not take double or extra doses without advice.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store at room temperature between 15 and 30 degrees C (59 and 86 degrees F). Protect from light. Keep container tightly closed. Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • Cushing's syndrome

  • diabetes

  • glaucoma

  • heart disease

  • high blood pressure

  • infection (especially a virus infection such as chickenpox, cold sores, or herpes)

  • kidney disease

  • liver disease

  • mental illness

  • myasthenia gravis

  • osteoporosis

  • seizures

  • stomach or intestine problems

  • thyroid disease

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to lactose, prednisone, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Visit your doctor or health care professional for regular checks on your progress. If you are taking this medicine over a prolonged period, carry an identification card with your name and address, the type and dose of your medicine, and your doctor's name and address.

This medicine may increase your risk of getting an infection. Tell your doctor or health care professional if you are around anyone with measles or chickenpox, or if you develop sores or blisters that do not heal properly.

If you are going to have surgery, tell your doctor or health care professional that you have taken this medicine within the last twelve months.

Ask your doctor or health care professional about your diet. You may need to lower the amount of salt you eat.

This medicine may affect blood sugar levels. If you have diabetes, check with your doctor or health care professional before you change your diet or the dose of your diabetic medicine.

Online Medical Reviewer: Louise Akin, RN, BSN
Online Medical Reviewer: Daphne Pierce-Smith, RN, MSN, FNP, CCRC
Last Review Date: 8/2/2012
© 2000-2014 Krames StayWell, 780 Township Line Road, Yardley, PA 19067. All rights reserved. This information is not intended as a substitute for professional medical care. Always follow your healthcare professional's instructions.